Presentation in the Roundtable: “Latin American knowledge contributions to International Relations”

Presentation in the Roundtable: “Latin American knowledge contributions to International Relations”

Melisa Deciancio participated in the Roundtable: “Latin American knowledge contributions to International Relations” invited by the Centre for the International Politics of Knowledge (KNOWLEDGE Centre) at the University of Aberystwyth, UK, on December 1st, 2021, chaired by Amaya Querejazu (University of Aberystwyth) and with the participation of Marcos Scauso (Quinnipiac University) and Kinti Pablo Orellana (Queen Mary University of London).

She focused on her more recent research agenda on a renewed reading and conceptualization of dependency approaches based on the study of bioeconomy as a policy agenda in South America. She addressed the contributions of Latin America to International Relations based on her recently published book “Latin America in Global International Relations” (Routledge, 2022), edited with Amitav Acharya (American University) and Diana Tussie (FLACSO Argentina).

Presentations at the 5th International Conference on Public Policy (ICPP5)

During the second week of July of 2021 it took place the 5th International Conference on Public Policy (ICPP5) in Barcelona, Spain, organized by the International on Public Policy Association (IPPA) and the Institut Barcelona d’Estudis Internacionals (IBEI). In this conference, two of the PhD students from the SABio Project, Daniel Kefeli and Guilherme Queiroz do Stein, presented in two panels of it.

Daniel Kefeli presented at the Panel “Policy problems and policy integration. Differences and similarities across sectors” moderated by Guillermo Cejudo and Philipp Trein. This panel contributed to the literature by analyzing how the process of policymaking and the politics of policy integration differ among policy fields. In the 3rd session, which was focused on “Theory, institutions and Methods”, Daniel’s presentation was regarding the theoretical framework of his thesis titled “Assessing policy interaction towards sustainable forestry bioeconomy in Uruguay. In the near future is expected to develop a special issue of a jornal based on the papers presented in the panel.

Guilherme de Queiroz Stein participated in the panel “Agenda 2030 and Institutional Change in the Global South”, coordinated by Paul Cisneros and Sofia Cordero from the Instituto de Altos Estudios Nacionales (IAEN), Ecuador. On the occasion, Guilherme presented his research on the governance of the bioeconomy in Brazil, focusing on the role of biodiversity in the development of the bioeconomy and on the implementation of the new Brazilian biodiversity law, which regulates bioprospecting activities, access to traditional knowledge and benefits sharing. As a result of the panel, the researchers intend to consolidate a network and jointly produce publications, having as a common theme the institutional challenges to implement the SDGs in the global south.

ICPP5 had 1233 registered participants, 975 virtual and 258 on-site, coming from 78 different countries. It had 155 panels, of which 64 were hybrid and 91 virtual. ICPP5 was 281 sessions divided into 10 multi-sessions of 2 hours with 1527 papers presented.

More information: https://www.ippapublicpolicy.org/conference/icpp5-barcelona-2021/13

Workshop on Argentine Bioeconomy

Workshop on Argentine Bioeconomy

The Stakeholder Workshop on Argentine Bioeconomy took place on July 28th and gathered a diverse group of around 40 professionals from different backgrounds and disciplines. Its main goal was to obtain insights into the status and future developments of the Argentine Bioeconomy. It was moderated by Melisa Deciancio (Uni Münster) and Pablo Mac Clay (Uni Bonn).

Assuming that the bioeconomy is a broad concept, the discussion was organized based on bioeconomy definitions from the European Commission and ECLAC, including biotechnological trajectories and local initiatives built upon socio-ecological systems. The discussion was organized in two main blocks: (1) knowledge and skills for the bioeconomy and (2) social and environmental sustainability of the bioeconomy. This workshop was an excellent opportunity for SABio researchers to interact with Argentine stakeholders and understand more on challenges and opportunities for developing the bioeconomy in the country.

Presentation at the EADI ISS General Conference 2021: Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice

Presentation at the EADI ISS General Conference 2021: Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice

Helena Varkkey (Universiti Malaya and Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore) and Karen Siegel presented a paper comparing soybean production in South America and palm oil production in Southeast Asia to examine how the extractive imperative shapes approaches to sustainability. The paper was part of the panel “The Extractive Imperative: a Global Phenomenon?” chaired by Lorenzo Pellegrini and Murat Arsel (both International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam).

More information about EADI ISS General Conference 2021.

Book launch panel debate “The Politics of Bioeconomy and Sustainability” by Mairon Bastos Lima, Stockholm Environment Institute

Book launch panel debate “The Politics of Bioeconomy and Sustainability” by Mairon Bastos Lima, Stockholm Environment Institute

To launch the book “The Politics of Bioeconomy and Sustainability: Lessons from Biofuel Governance, Policies and Production Strategies in the Emerging World” by Mairon Bastos Lima (Research Fellow SEI and scientific advisor of the SABio project), Stockholm Environment Institute hosted a virtual panel debate with the author and three international bioeconomy experts: Francis X. Johnson, Senior Research Fellow and Leader of the Initiative on Governing Bioeconomy Pathways, Stockholm Environment Institute; Karen Siegel, Head of the research group “Transformation and Sustainability Governance in South American Bioeconomies”, Institute of Political Science, University of Münster; and Wahida Maghraby, Researcher, Indonesian Center for Agricultural Socio Economic and Policy Studies (ICASEPS), Ministry of Agriculture Indonesia. With an audience from several countries and continents including South Africa, Uruguay, Brazil, Sweden, Germany and Ireland the Q+A was lively and insightful.

For those who missed the event, a recording is available on SEI’s YouTube channel:

Workshop on “Agri-food governance, sustainable development and bioeconomy in Uruguay” in CONICYT

Workshop on “Agri-food governance, sustainable development and bioeconomy in Uruguay” in CONICYT

On 31st of May, 2021, at the invitation of the National Council for Innovation, Science and Technology (CONICYT) of Uruguay, Karen Siegel and Daniel Kefeli gave a presentation on “Agri-food governance, sustainable development and bioeconomy in Uruguay”. About 30 attendees from different institutions participated, including the National Agricultural Research Institute (INIA), the Universidad de la República (UdelaR), the Ministry of Livestock, Agriculture and Fisheries (MGAP), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the Instituto Saras (South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies), the National Secretariat for Science and Technology and the Basic Sciences Development Program (PEDECIBA).

Karen Siegel presented the main results of the Policy Brief “Promoting inclusive bioeconomies? Lessons from agri-food governance and the politics of the Sustainable Development Goals in South America” where she highlighted how Uruguay and Paraguay have taken up the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), emphasizing the level of inclusion and participation of the different actors involved. She also presented the SABio Project and its main lines of research. Daniel Kefeli described the different concepts and existing visions of the bioeconomy, as well as the characteristics of the strategies implemented internationally to promote this paradigm and to contemplate the risks implicit in it. Finally, he reported on the process that took place in Uruguay to incorporate the bioeconomy into the country’s public policies and commented on some ongoing projects related to this topic.

During the session there was an enriching and active discussion among the participants where questions were raised and comments were made regarding the challenges in the implementation of the SDGs, the participation of agroecology in the concept of bioeconomy, the role and learning of the public participation in the design of public policies, among other issues. Finally, the workshop promoted the exchange of ideas for future work on issues related to the bioeconomy.

Projects and institutions that are carrying out projects related to the bioeconomy in Uruguay:

  • CSIC – Udelar Project: Is the bioeconomy a plausible sustainable human development strategy for the northeast of Uruguay? Theoretical-conceptual discussion and empirical bases for its implementation. Instituto de Desarrollo Sostenible, Innovación e Inclusión Social (IDIIS) – Centro Universitario de Tacuarembó – Udelar. http://www.idiis.edu.uy/

Presentations at the IAMO Forum 2021

Trevor Tisler and Pablo Mac Clay, junior researchers at SABio Project, presented at the “IAMO Forum 2021 – Agrifood Systems in the Bioeconomy” (June 7-9). The IAMO Forum is an annual platform for international research in agricultural and related disciplines. This Conference was part of the Bioeconomy Week in Halle

Pablo Mac Clay joined “Parallel Session B2 – Value Chains” and the title of his presentation was “Value chains and innovation pathways in the transition to a sustainable bioeconomy”. In this working paper, he presented a typology of value chains in the context of the bioeconomy. The main research question is the role of value chains in providing the enabling environment for a sustainable transition to a bioeconomy, and the potential welfare effects of this transition from a social sustainability perspective. The panel was completed by Pascal Grouiez (LADYSS) and Verena Beck (Thünen Institute) and was moderated by Ivan Duric (IAMO). Watch Pablo’s recorded presentation here:

 

Trevor Tisler was part of “Parallel Session A5 – Decarbonization and Green Growth) and presented on “Deforestation Contamination in Brazil’s Ethanol Supply Chains under the National Biofuels Policy”. The preliminary results from this working paper’s spatially-explicit deforestation contamination model were presented for three of Brazil’s principal sugarcane cultivating and ethanol producing regions. The main research question focuses on identifying and quantifying direct and indirect deforestation and its linked carbon emissions that may be contaminating carbon offset credit sales in Brazil’s first regulated carbon marketplace, the CBIO marketplace. The panel participants also included presentations from Lanjiao Wen (IAMO) and Mansoor Ahmed Koondhar (Northwest Agriculture & Forestry University), and the session was moderated by Florian Schierhorn (IAMO). Watch Trevor’s recorded presentation here:

 

Click here for more information on the conference.

Presentation at the British International Studies Association Conference 2021

Presentation at the British International Studies Association Conference 2021

Melisa Deciancio participated in the panel “Inequalities in Bodies, Land and the Biosphere” at the British International Studies Association Conference, addressing core-periphery dynamics on bioeconomy projects in Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay and, in a broader sense, the impacts of bioeconomy on creating new forms of dependency for South American countries. The other panellists included Nicola Smith (University of Birmingham), Amelia Morris (University of Law); and Sulagna Basu (University of Sydney).

The papers were commented on by Ben Richardson from University of Warwick.

Join us for the virtual seminar “The politics of biofuels and bioeconomy: who wins and who loses?”, 17 June, Stockholm Environment Institute

Join us for the virtual seminar “The politics of biofuels and bioeconomy: who wins and who loses?”, 17 June, Stockholm Environment Institute

The bioeconomy offers a way to transition away from fossil fuels and transform our economies. But, like any profound change, this transition won’t be without challenges. Who will benefit and who may be left behind? How are the new institutions and policies being shaped, and by whom? And how can the development of the bioeconomy be steered to addressing socio-economic and environmental issues without perpetuating the inequalities of the fossil economy (or creating new ones)?

These questions will be discussed at the book launch event: “The politics of bioeconomy and sustainability: Lessons from biofuel governance, policies and production strategies in the emerging world” by Mairon G. Bastos Lima.

Speakers:

  • Mairon G. Bastos Lima, author of the book. Research Fellow, Stockholm Environment Institute
  • Francis X. Johnson, Senior Research Fellow and Leader of the Initiative on Governing Bioeconomy Pathways, Stockholm Environment Institute
  • Karen Siegel, Head of the research group “Transformation and Sustainability Governance in South American Bioeconomies”, Institute of Political Science, University of Münster
  • Wahida Maghraby, Researcher, Indonesian Center for Agricultural Socio Economic and Policy Studies (ICASEPS), Ministry of Agriculture Indonesia

Zoom meeting 14:00-15:00 CEST online, register here to receive the link.

More information at https://www.sei.org/events/the-politics-of-biofuels-and-bioeconomy-who-wins-and-who-loses/

Presentation at the International Studies Association 2021 Virtual Convention

Presentation at the International Studies Association 2021 Virtual Convention

Karen Siegel, Thomas Dietz and Melisa Deciancio participated in the panel “Governing Sustainable Development Agendas in the Global South: Global, Regional and Local Governance of Bioeconomy Agendas”, addressing the challenges and potential that the implementation of sustainable bioeconomy strategies face in countries in the Global South across multiple scales.

Karen Siegel discussed to what extent the concept of bioeconomy fosters or hinders inclusive and peaceful sustainability transitions in South American natural resource governance.

Focusing on the Argentine case, Melisa Deciancio discussed how the implementation of a bioeconomy policy strategy can shape the development model and the risks of reproducing new forms of dependency in Latin America.

The other panellists included Rocio Diaz Chavez from Stockholm Environment Institute Africa Centre and Imperial College London who, focusing on gender equality and poverty reduction goals, addressed the need for sustainability indicators to monitor bioeconomy development in Africa; and Mairon Bastos Lima from Chalmers University of Technology, who addressed how corporate dominance by agribusiness can threaten the sustainability of the bioeconomy transition in Brazil.

The papers were commented on by Carole-Anne Sénit from Utrecht University.